In Liberty

Bill of Rights, Constitution, Declaration of Independence, federal government, First Amendment, free speech, freedom, inequality, liberty, mandatory, regulations, secular government, tyranny, Uncategorized


What was the purpose for the creation of our Nation?

The Society of our Nation was formed from different groups of people who came from different societies which, in many instances, held different social customs, religious beliefs, languages, etc. 

The common characteristics, in general, were those of free-thinkers and people tired of being ruled and tired of having their labor, goods, and their freedom of speech and thought controlled by others.

While it is true that many people came to America to escape religious persecutions throughout Europe, many others were (regardless of their personal religious beliefs) coming  to America for secularist principles, not founded in any religious doctrine.

See: Freethinkers: A History of American Secularism
by Susan Jacoby


It can be stated that religious intolerance did rear its ugly head in America, as related in the testimonies of the Salem Witch Trials, and which was also well noted in the Antisemitism attitude in the United States into the 1960’s. But for the most part, people tended to their own lives and families without interference into the lives of others.



Our Constitution’s First Article of Amendment states explicitly that, “Congress shall make no laws respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise there of…” and although Congress has not legislated for establishing religion, they have passed many laws that do infringe on the free exercise of the religious beliefs of some. Laws that force people to do things that are prohibited by their faith are by their very nature are in fact unconstitutional and need to by nullified by the State(s) in which these laws affect the religious expressions of their constituency  A law such as ACA which includes mandates directing healthcare providers to provide contraception and abortion is a prime example. The prohibition of religious symbols from being displayed in a public building or a public employee’s work space is another example of the government displaying religious intolerance.

The Constitution does not separate people into any groups based on religion or sexual preferences. The Constitution does not provide for the government to give special status to any group. And while there were blatant inequalities regarding Native Tribal Nations and to Africans brought to America as slaves, these  were the few constitutional exceptions and I trust that they have been remedied through the common sense of the people. 

Often times when confronted by the people, Congress defends itself for passing laws by referring to the parts of the Constitution that seem to serve their unconstitutional legislation. The “necessary and proper” clause and the “provide for the general welfare of the people” must not be construed to mean they can write and pass laws simple because it seems “necessary and proper” to the special interests served by the passage of such law(s). Sometimes it seems the best course of action is to take no action at all.

Happy Independence Day!


© 2008-2016 by Fred Marsico & MKUltra

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